Women’s Health

November 29, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Uncategorized

Our Women’s Health Program offers assistance to clients within a caring and private setting. Jane K. O’Brien, MSPT, member of the American Physical Therapy Association, Section on Women’s Health, will create a treatment program tailored specifically for the individual needs of the client.

  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD)
  • Overactive Bladder ( OAB)
  • post Breast Surgery Care
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pre and Post partum Care
  • Lymph edema/breast cancer
  • Pre natal Fitness
  • Abdominal Rehab ( post surgical/ diastasis)

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

PFD includes a myriad of diagnoses which affect both men and women. Symptoms may limit a person’s ability to perform daily activities, cause one to change exercise habits and create embarrassment.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Weakness

  • Urinary and fecal incontinence
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Post prostatectomy

Pelvic Pain

  • Levator Ani Syndrome
  • Penetration Pain
  • Hips, Abdomen, Low Back, buttocks
  • Sacroiliac ( SIJ) pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Dysmenorrhea ( painful periods)
  • Vulvodynia
  • Endometriosis, Abdominal Adhesions

Both men and women can benefit from our services for PFD. We have answers and solutions. PFD is common but not normal. You can take control of your symptoms and often relieve them completely.

Incontinence Helpful Hints

  1. Allow no more than 2-4 hours between voiding.
  2. Avoid bladder irritant of tea, fruit juices, acids
  3. Consume adequate water and fiber
  4. Squeeze before you sneeze
  5. Avoid liquids 2-3 hours before bedtime
  6. Avoid tendency to go “Just In Case” ( JIC pees)
  7. Do your Kegels 10 seconds each 30-80 times per day.

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Physical Therapy

June 12, 2008 by Jane O'Brien  
Filed under Physical Therapy, Women's Health

North Tahoe Physical Therapy June 11, 2008

The term pelvic floor refers to the sling of muscles, ligaments, and fascia which spans from the front of the pelvis at the pubic bone to the posterior pelvis at the tail bone. The purpose of the musculature is to support the pelvic organs (uterus, colon, and bladder), allow for control of the outlets (urethra and rectum) and provide tone for sensation for the sexual functions. It is important for this area to have proper muscle tone. Excess tone of the muscles can cause difficulty sitting, pain during intercourse, hip and low back pain or retention. Diminished tone may lead to incontinence, organ prolapse and possibly decreased sexual response.
Commonly, people associate pelvic floor dysfunction with incontinence. However, there are a myriad of diagnoses that fall under this category such as overactive bladder, pelvic pain, prolapsed uterus, painful periods (dysmenorrhea), interstitial cystitis, coccyx pain, painful intercourse, and many others. Symptoms may limit a man or woman’s ability to perform daily activities, cause a change in exercise habits and create embarrassment. Problems in this area are often not discussed with medical professionals and therefore, go untreated.

Many physical therapists have specialized training that can benefit men and women with issues of the pelvic floor. These therapists utilize every aspect of their physical therapy training to evaluate patients and to provide intervention to overcome these dysfunctions. Treatments may consist of a combination of many techniques. Exercises such as “Kegels,” which are geared for this area, greatly enhance muscle function when performed properly. Relaxation techniques may be utilized to assist with decreasing tone and pain. Manual techniques, such as Myofascial Release and soft tissue massage are often used to relieve tension. Biofeedback is used to increase awareness of proper muscle recruitment or to quiet overactive muscles. Electrical stimulation may be used to recruit and train pelvic floor musculature or to relieve pain. Joint mobilizations are often utilized to restore pelvic alignment and motion. In addition, patient education can assist with prevention of dysfunction.

Physical therapy for the pelvic floor dysfunction is relatively new and not widely known by many medical professionals in the USA. There are only a handful of Physical Therapists who are trained in Pelvic Floor therapy in Northern Nevada. But, Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is common. Just consider the number of commercials from the pharmaceutical industry promoting drugs aimed at treatment of these issues. Numerous surgeries are advocated as an answer for many pelvic floor issues. Many are unsuccessful. Physical Therapy can provide tremendous relief for Healthcare consumers who want to take control of their symptoms and overcome them without the use of longterm drugs or surgeries.

When choosing a physical therapist for treatment of a pelvic floor dysfunction, it is important to inquire of their training, experience and outcomes with this area to ascertain if they are qualified to treat this area. The Section on Women’s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association offers training and mentoring leading to a certificate program called the Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy (CAPP). Approximately 150 PT’s have received the CAPP to date. To find a Physical Therapist who is trained to work with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, one can contact the Section on Women’s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association. The web site is http://www.womenshealthapta.org/. The website provides articles and resources for consumers to learn more. One can also log onto www.northtahoept.com for further information and treatment options.
Jane O’Brien, MSPT is a physical therapist at North Tahoe Physical Therapy who provides services for the pelvic floor, orthopedics and pain. She is a candidate for the CAPP expecting to complete her certificate in summer 2008.

-Jane O’Brien, MSPT

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

May 20, 2008 by Jane O'Brien  
Filed under Women's Health

Commonly, people associate pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) with incontinence. However, there are a myriad of diagnoses that fall under this category such as overactive bladder, pelvic pain, prolapsed uterus, interstitial cystitis, coccyx pain, painful intercourse, and many others. Symptoms may limit a woman’s ability to perform her daily activities, change or limit her exercise habits, and create embarrassment. Problems in this area are often not discussed with medical professionals, and therefore, go untreated.

Physical therapy can greatly benefit the pelvic floor. Exercises geared for this area greatly enhance muscle function. Relaxation techniques may be utilized to assist with decreasing tone and pain. Manual techniques, such as Myofascial Release and soft tissue massage are often used to relieve tension. Biofeedback is used to increase awareness of proper muscle recruitment or to quiet overactive muscles. Electrical simulation may be used to recruit and train pelvic floor musculature. In addition, patient education can assist with prevention of dysfunction.

When choosing a physical therapist for treatment of a pelvic floor dysfunction, it is important to ascertain if she is qualified to treat this area. Be sure she has taken coursework specifically for PFD. Ask her how many clients she has treated for your issue. Ask outcomes of treatments. Ask if she can help you gain relief of your symptoms and improve your lifestyle.

PFD is common, but not normal. You do not need to simply accept your symptoms as a process of growing old or due to childbirth. You can take control of your symptoms and often relieve them completely.

Jane O’Brien, MSPT works with clients ( male and female) who have Pelvic Floor Dysfunction at North Tahoe Physical Therapy.

The Certification of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy

May 15, 2008 by Jane O'Brien  
Filed under Women's Health

The Certification of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy is offered by the Section on Women’s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association. The Section on Women’s Health offers three levels of Pelvic Physical Therapy courses. These courses provide evidence-based education for the learner to acquire skills and knowledge to provide Physical Therapy interventions for male and female clients of all ages with pelvic floor dysfunctions, including pelvic pain, urinary incontinence, endometriosis, and many other conditions. This certification prepares the learner for the Women’s Health specialization Exam.

The requirements are attendance at the SOWH Pelvic Physical Therapy classes level 1,2,3, pass the competency skills tests for each level, pass didactics tests for each level, and submit a case report. Experienced therapists who have completed previous training in pelvic physical therapy can apply for the transitional CAPP. I qualify for the tCAPP.

I have nearly completed the requirements for the Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy. I just received my certificate of completion for the Level 3 class I took in March 2008 in Portland. I received a 94% on my post test. All that is left to do is to complete my Case Study and submit it. This could take some time as it involves both evaluating and following a client through their pelvic floor therapy, writing the requirements for the case study, and having it accepted. I expect to complete this process in the next 6 months. I’ll keep you posted!

-Jane

Women’s Health and Wellness

January 26, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Services, Women's Health

Our Women’s Health Program offers assistance to clients within a caring and private setting. Jane K. O’Brien, MSPT, member of the American Physical Therapy Association, Section on Women’s Health, will create a treatment program tailored specifically for the individual needs of the client.

  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD)
  • Overactive Bladder ( OAB)
  • post Breast Surgery Care
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pre and Post partum Care
  • Lymph edema/breast cancer
  • Pre natal Fitness
  • Abdominal Rehab ( post surgical/ diastasis)

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

PFD includes a myriad of diagnoses which affect both men and women. Symptoms may limit a person’s ability to perform daily activities, cause one to change exercise habits and create embarrassment.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Weakness

  • Urinary and fecal incontinence
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Post prostatectomy

Pelvic Pain

  • Levator Ani Syndrome
  • Penetration Pain
  • Hips, Abdomen, Low Back, buttocks
  • Sacroiliac ( SIJ) pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Dysmenorrhea ( painful periods)
  • Vulvodynia
  • Endometriosis, Abdominal Adhesions

Both men and women can benefit from our services for PFD. We have answers and solutions. PFD is common but not normal. You can take control of your symptoms and often relieve them completely.

Incontinence Helpful Hints

  1. Allow no more than 2-4 hours between voiding.
  2. Avoid bladder irritant of tea, fruit juices, acids
  3. Consume adequate water and fiber
  4. Squeeze before you sneeze
  5. Avoid liquids 2-3 hours before bedtime
  6. Avoid tendency to go “Just In Case” ( JIC pees)
  7. Do your Kegels 10 seconds each 30-80 times per day.