Women’s Health

November 29, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Uncategorized

Our Women’s Health Program offers assistance to clients within a caring and private setting. Jane K. O’Brien, MSPT, member of the American Physical Therapy Association, Section on Women’s Health, will create a treatment program tailored specifically for the individual needs of the client.

  • Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD)
  • Overactive Bladder ( OAB)
  • post Breast Surgery Care
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pre and Post partum Care
  • Lymph edema/breast cancer
  • Pre natal Fitness
  • Abdominal Rehab ( post surgical/ diastasis)

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

PFD includes a myriad of diagnoses which affect both men and women. Symptoms may limit a person’s ability to perform daily activities, cause one to change exercise habits and create embarrassment.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Weakness

  • Urinary and fecal incontinence
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Post prostatectomy

Pelvic Pain

  • Levator Ani Syndrome
  • Penetration Pain
  • Hips, Abdomen, Low Back, buttocks
  • Sacroiliac ( SIJ) pain
  • Painful intercourse
  • Dysmenorrhea ( painful periods)
  • Vulvodynia
  • Endometriosis, Abdominal Adhesions

Both men and women can benefit from our services for PFD. We have answers and solutions. PFD is common but not normal. You can take control of your symptoms and often relieve them completely.

Incontinence Helpful Hints

  1. Allow no more than 2-4 hours between voiding.
  2. Avoid bladder irritant of tea, fruit juices, acids
  3. Consume adequate water and fiber
  4. Squeeze before you sneeze
  5. Avoid liquids 2-3 hours before bedtime
  6. Avoid tendency to go “Just In Case” ( JIC pees)
  7. Do your Kegels 10 seconds each 30-80 times per day.

Physical Therapy

November 29, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Uncategorized

More than just Physical Therapy

At North Tahoe Physical Therapy, we offer a unique combination of Myofascial Release, Hands-on soft tissue mobilization, skeletal mobilizations, Pilates- based exercises, Education and Self Management.
Our therapists are highly trained, experienced professionals. We provide a strong interaction between you, your doctor and your physical therapist.  North Tahoe Physical Therapy uses a 1-on-1 approach to Physical therapy with exceptional customer service. We treat you as a whole person, not just your injury.

Each client obtains a thorough explanation of their condition. Your physician receives timely reports regarding your progress. We empower you to become active partners in your recovery and health maintenance. Our personalized approach results in your wellness and satisfaction. Click here for client testimonials.

The cornerstone of our approach is Myofascial Release. Find out more about Myofascial Release

Our Treatment Philosophy

Our treatment philosophy is based on the pelvis, the base of the spine.  We believe the pelvis is the foundation of the body.  This foundation must be level for the head and neck to sit properly and for the legs to hit the ground evenly.  When a client comes to us with “low back pain”, we begin by assessing the pelvis for symmetry.  If the pelvis is rotated or if the trunk is shortened on one side, the surrounding soft tissues will attempt to stabilize the system.  This may lead to muscle spasms, pain, or tension of the nerves and the discs which sit atop the pelvis. Additionally, the spine may rotate and side bend in response to the un-level base below.  Consequently, the head which sits atop the spine will be un-level.

Our bodies are smart.  If our spine is rotated, we naturally adjust our head to have our eyes level. This may lead to issues of muscle spasms, muscle tension, TMJ/jaw disorders and headaches. So, for a person who comes to NTPT complaining of TMJ, headache or neck pain, our treatment starts at the pelvis.

Like a house if the foundation is not level, the roof will crack and the windows won’t easily slide open or close. Therefore, it only makes sense to balance the pelvis, which is the foundation of the body.

Self empowerment
A maintenance program of Home exercises, education about how to avoid aggravating your condition, and awareness of how you can help yourself are important components of your care. North Tahoe Physical therapy, we empower you to be an active participant in your health and wellness. You may spend 1-3 hours a week with our team of therapists at North Tahoe Physical Therapy. There are 168 hours in a week. What are you doing the other 165 hours?

Get well
• Orthopedics
• Sports Injury Care
• Back and Neck care
• Incontinence/Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
• TMJ/Migraines/Headaches

Stay Well
• Myofascial Release therapy
• Massage
• Personal training
• Medically Supervised gym
• PILATES
• Classes and workshops

Address the Symptoms, look elsewhere for the Cause
At North Tahoe Physical Therapy, we treat the cause of your problems. Our evaluation is a full body assessment. We look for Pelvic imbalances, fascial pulls, and postural abnormalities. We then determine how these deficits may have created your symptoms. For example, neck or jaw problems may arise from an unlevel pelvis. Knee issues may be due to a pelvis imbalance. If we only treated the symptomatic jaw without leveling the pelvis, the issues will return because the problem has not been corrected. By treating the cause, we are able to address and decrease the symptoms.

About Us

November 26, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Uncategorized

Our Mission

Our highly skilled team at North Tahoe Physical Therapy is focused on helping you to achieve your optimal state of health through exceptional therapy, education and personalized treatment programs designed to return you to the lifestyle that you desire.

Our Staff


Jane O’Brien,
MSPT
Advanced Myofascial Release Practitioner
Women’s Health Therapist

Jane is the owner and director of North Tahoe Physical Therapy. She received her Master of Science Degree from Boston University in 1992. She has over 15 years experience in treatment of orthopedics, women’s health, and pain. Jane has extensively trained in manual therapies such as Myofascial release, Craniosacral therapy, and spinal and joint mobilizations, dynamic stabilization exercises and strength and conditioning.

Since 2000, Jane has been an instructor for John Barnes’ Myofascial Release Seminars. While living in Sedona, Jane trained and worked with Barnes at his clinic.  She presents several workshops annually on the Myofascial Release technique.

Jane is currently in pursuit of the Certificate of Achievement in Pelvic Physical Therapy (CAPP). This honor is granted to physical therapists that have completed the required training and testing through the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Section on Women’s Health. The CAPP demonstrates dedication and advanced training in the field of Women’s Health. She expects to complete her studies and receive the CAPP in Spring 2009.

Memberships:
APTA-American Physical Therapy Association, Section on Women’s Health
AAUW- American Association of University Women
Hobbies: Belly dancing, skiing, hiking, rollerblading,

Brian Hrindo, MT
Brian graduated from Bowling Green State University in northwestern Ohio with a Bachelor of Education in Kinesiology, where he studied Early Childhood Development and Effective Movement in Athletes. He has been practicing as a Massage Therapist since graduating from the Utah College of Massage Therapy. Brian specializes in injury massage, Russian Sports Massage, Craniosacral Therapy, and Deep Tissue Massage. He has trained under John F. Barnes, international lecturer and authority on Myofascial Release, and has become a highly skilled Myofascial Release practitioner. In his spare time, Brian enjoys relaxing on his boat on Lake Tahoe, skiing, mountain biking, and rafting the rivers of the Wild West.

Rebecca L. Deal, MPT
Rebecca received her Master of Science degree from California State University, Long Beach in 2005. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science and a minor in Nutrition from the University of California, Davis. She believes in helping people by educating and empowering them to take responsibility for their health.In her spare time, she enjoys snowboarding, snowshoeing, and hiking the Tahoe trails with her dog.

Our Location

889 Alder Ave., Suite 105
Incline Village, NV 89451
775-831-6600 office
775-831-6697 fax

We are located on the ground floor of the Lakeside Medical and Professional Building, across the street from the hospital.

Our History

North Tahoe Physical Therapy was established in the 1980’s in Incline Village, NV. by Claudia Dill, PT. Ten years later, Thom Werner, PT, bought North Tahoe Physical Therapy and operated the clinic for 14 years.

In 2003, Jane O’Brien, MSPT, became the 3rd owner of North Tahoe Physical Therapy.

Jane O’Brien, MSPT, director and owner of North Tahoe Physical Therapy, says, “Many people think of physical therapy as exercise and hot packs. We want to change that perception. We believe that a hands-on, intuitive approach combined with movement is the key to healing and restoration of function. Our staff has dedicated many years learning to use our hands as tools for healing.”

Getting in Shape for Skiing

November 19, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Personal Training

What are the most important elements to getting in shape for ski season?

The first thing that comes to mind for getting in “ski shape” is strengthening. I believe everyone would agree that strengthening of the lower extremity or leg muscles is top on the list. The legs are doing most of the work during a ski or snowboard run, so, focus strength training here. The muscles to emphasize are the quads (front of the thighs) the hamstrings (back of the thighs), the calf muscles, and the glutes. It is very important for one to gain strength of the proximal leg muscles, those closest to the trunk, typically called the hips. The stronger one is in the hip region, the less strain will occur across the knee joint.
A great exercise for the whole lower extremity is the squat. This uses the buttocks, the quads, the calves and the hamstrings. Also great are lunges and leg presses. These exercises directly correlate to the motions used in telemark skiing and downhill skiing. Bicycling is a wonderful outdoor activity for lower extremities. Lastly, calf raises (going up and down on tip toes) is great for balance and calf strength.

Besides strength, flexibility is highly important for all activities. A tight muscle is more likely to tear or be strained because there is no slack in the system. Stretches create length in the muscle and allow for freedom of motion.

While everyone agrees that training the lower extremity muscles is highly important, I also want to emphasize the importance of training the trunk or core muscles. The trunk is the “power center” of the body. These muscles include, among others, the abdominals, the iliopsoas, the glutes, hamstrings, and the spinal extensors. A strong core helps with speed, balance, strength, and power, quickly changing directions, improvement of skill level and prevention of injury. A training program needs to consist of trunk flexibility and strength conditioning. Having a strong and flexible core allows one to twist, turn and stabilize the body during the downhill journey. According to Douglas Brooks, MS, who wrote Effective Strength Training, the trunk is the base or foundation of the body. A body is only as strong as its weakest link. A body needs a strong base from which to direct its energy. If the core is weak, it leads to poor performance or worse, injury.

Join our email list to get our special report on the 3 Keys to a Fantastic Ski Season.  Just leave your name and email address in the space on the right side of this page.

Physical Therapy Hows & Whys

October 22, 2008 by Jane O'Brien  
Filed under Physical Therapy

Is Physical Therapy a good way to get started on an exercise program if you have been inactive for a long period of time or is a personal trainer a better option?

It is always best to consult with your doctor before beginning an exercise after prolonged inactivity. Your doctor will perform a complete physical and determine if you will be at risk or if you are safe to begin an exercise program. If the MD gives you the “Go Ahead”, physical therapy is your best option for proceeding.

The PT will evaluate your body before developing an exercise program. Tests may include an assessment of muscle strength in your arms, legs and core. He or she will assess your flexibility, your ligamentous stability, your range of motion in your joints, your endurance level, and your current fitness level. The PT will measure our blood pressure and your heart rate at rest and determine an appropriate activity level for your exercise program. He or she can tailor the program towards your specific fitness goals, for example, weight loss, improved endurance, strength gains, toning or others you may have in mind. If you wish, the PT can also measure your body fat level and develop a plan to reduce that level.

One benefit of beginning a fitness program with a PT is that you are being medically monitored. As you proceed with your fitness program, the PT will assess your heart rate and blood pressure before, during and after activity. Your exercises will be adjusted accordingly. If you have any previous injuries, alert the PT so that area can be protected in your program to prevent a flare up. Additionally, the PT can add exercise to your program to rehabilitate the injured area.

One last advantage of a fitness program which is performed under the direction of a Physical Therapist is the price. A medically guided program may be covered under your health insurance. This means that you may only need to pay for your copayment or coinsurance. If, however, you do not have insurance, many Physical Therapists provide personal training to their clients. The cost may be slightly higher than the fee a personal trainer may charge (about $10-$20 on average). But, the Physical Therapist is a medical professional who has either a Masters or a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree and is trained in the biomechanics of the body, muscle structure and function, injuries and rehab, anatomy and physiology, orthopedics, and strengthening and conditioning.
North Tahoe Physical Therapy works with many clients for reconditioning programs both through insurance and on a cash payment basis. We also offer personal training and Pilates exercise programs.

-Jane O’Brien, MSPT

Massage and Chronic Pain

October 20, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Massage & Wellness, Personal Training

Can massage help me with chronic pain that I have had for years?

Therapeutic and deep tissue massage and bodywork can not only relieve acute symptoms but can also affect a change in chronic pain that you may have been experiencing on and off for years. In some cases, massage is the most beneficial tool used to deal with these ongoing discomforts.As with anything, it may take several sessions to relieve symptoms of chronic pain. You didn’t develop these pains overnight, so they may take more than one session to relieve. As you begin to treat your condition, it may be important to be treated several times before you can transition to a less frequent schedule for health maintenance.

Please be sure to share specifics with your massage therapist to develop the best plan for you.Massage therapy is particularly effective in treating the chronic pains experienced as a result of exercise, fibromyalgia, and job related discomforts (i.e. working at a computer, sitting or standing for long periods of time). I have the experience and training to facilitate your bodies healing process and look forward to ridding your body of the pain and discomfort that keep you from enjoying a healthy lifestyle in Lake Tahoe. Massage should not only be looked upon as a commodity, but as preventative maintenance on your body’s tissues and subsequent organs which is one of the best ways to stay out of your doctors’ waiting rooms.

-By: Brian Hrindo, LMT

Massage and Soreness

October 1, 2008 by Rebecca Deal  
Filed under Massage & Wellness

I just had a massage yesterday, why am I so sore today?

Chances are it was the bodywork you experienced the day before, and it’s perfectly okay. Yes, soreness can be an after-effect of the treatment and it is common to experience it. Soreness or tenderness can result from the pressure used to release the restrictions in your body’s tissue, and also can be a result of under-hydration either before or after the treatment. If the body is not being properly hydrated after the session to flush out the toxins, such as lactic acid, they may be re-deposited into the muscular system causing tenderness. A great approach would to be properly hydrated prior to your treatment by drinking 2-3 glasses in the hours before your appointment. Water is necessary for the liver to filter out the toxins and chemicals from our body, food, and medications.

A professional massage is more than an ordinary back rub. The reason that massage therapy is so effective is that it physically breaks up the restrictions in the muscle tissue causing pain. It is very much like doing a workout. If the muscles are not used to it, they often respond with some soreness. This should only last a day or two, if it does last longer, speak with your therapist about adjusting the treatment. However, just as with exercise, when your body adjusts to having this type of workout your physical response will also be less intense. As a therapist, I want to know how the body is feeling after the soreness does subside.

Hip Replacement Care

September 14, 2008 by admin  
Filed under Physical Therapy

My relative is getting ready to come home from the hospital after a total hip replacement surgery. What do I need to know to set up my home and make them most comfortable during their recovery?

After a standard posterior approach total hip replacement, most surgeons instruct the patient (and all involved caregivers) in three major hip precautions. Familiarizing yourself with these three rules will allow you to promote a speedy and safe recovery for your family member:

1. Avoid hip flexion more than 90°- Lifting the leg out in front beyond 90° puts excessive stress on the posterior joint capsule of the hip as it attempts to heal. Exercises that require excessive hip flexion such as marching and straight leg kicks are not recommended after a total hip replacement surgery until the medical professional instructs the patient in the proper form.

2. Avoid hip adduction- If a line were drawn down the middle of your body from head to toe, the affected hip cannot cross over this midline. This rule is particularly difficult to abide by when rolling over in bed. Using a pillow between the patient’s knees can prevent them from crossing the midline.

3. Avoid internal rotation- Do not allow the patient to turn the toes on their affected leg inward. Again, placing a pillow between their feet can prevent the patient from being able to internally rotate their hip.

Depending on the surgeon, physical therapy can begin soon after the patient awakes from the surgery. Specific questions should be directed to the doctor or physical therapist directing the patient care. As the caregiver, remember you are an important part of the rehab team and helping to communicate with the medical professionals can best promote a safe and speedy recovery for your loved one.

-Rebecca L. Deal, MSPT

10 Steps to an Ergonomic Office

Where do you spend the majority of the time during your typical work day? If your answer is sitting in an office chair staring at a computer, it is time to evaluate your work station with regards to your health. Setting up a desk that minimizes prolonged postural stresses can prevent work-related episodes of low back pain. To set up your own ergonomically designed work station, follow these 10 simple steps:

Sitting Posture- When sitting in your chair, it is important to maintain three spinal curves: an inward curve in your low back, an outward curve in the mid-back, and another inward curve in the neck. Shoulder should remain relaxed but kept back in a retracted position. Your head should be kept level with the chin tucked in for the ideal desk posture.

Seat Settings- Adjust your office chair for optimal posture and comfort. For computer work slightly recline the back of the chair. Although some office chairs have lumbar settings, a separate lumbar support pillow is best. A small towel rolled and put in the small of your back works great to maintain the inward lumbar curve. When sitting against the back of the chair, there should be approximately two inches between the edge of the seat and the back of the knees.

Bending in the Chair- To bend over to reach an object out of a low drawer or pick up an object from the floor it is imperative to maintain the inward curve in your low back. Scoot to the edge of the seat and extend one leg out in front of you. Place one hand on the desk surface to assist with balance and bend from the hips. Using your hips as the hinge for this bending motion helps protect the low back.

Turning in the Chair- No Twisting!! When it is necessary to reach into the cabinet behind you or respond to a co-worker in the cubical next to you, it is important to avoid twisting motions that put excessive forces on the spine. Instead, move your body as a single unit in the direction you intend to go with the hips and feet pointed in the same direction.

Foot Rest- Optimal leg position is a 90° angle at the hips and knees. A 90° angle is best obtained using an appropriate height foot rest. Prevent “slouching” by sliding the office chair under the desk as far as possible while making sure to have adequate leg room.

Wrists over Keyboard- Chronic incorrect wrist positioning while typing can lead to the common office injury of carpal tunnel syndrome. To avoid carpal tunnel syndrome, use a wrist rest to position the wrists straight. Keep both of the elbows bent approximately 90° and supported by the desk surface. Adjusting the keyboard to maintain the straightened wrist position can help prevent the excessive wrist extension which leads to carpal tunnel injuries.

Monitor Position- The computer monitor should be angled to be level with the eyes in order to maintain proper head and neck posture. When attempting to type written material, use a document holder to position items at eye level.

Reaching across the Desk- Arrange the work area to eliminate tasks of repetitive reaching. Keep frequently used items close while storing rarely used supplies in a lower drawer. Repetitive lifting can irritate rotator cuff muscles and should be avoided without proper conditioning.

Talking on the Phone- When conducting business on the phone, do not support the receiver between your neck and shoulder. It is best to use a head-set or speaker-phone features to maintain proper neck alignment while talking on the phone for long business conversations.

Take Frequent Rest Breaks for Exercise- To take the strain off your back and prevent fatigue, change positions often. Alternate job tasks that require different postures when possible. The goal for all office workers is to take a break for one minute every hour to stretch and mobilize all the major joints of the body.

So if you’re up for the challenge of setting up your own ergonomically correct work station, print this list out, tape it to the bottom of your monitor and take the time to save your spine from the work-related aches and pains. For additional work station consultation advice or further questions, contact the physical therapy team at North Tahoe Physical Therapy.

-Rebecca L. Deal, MSPT

RICE to Control Swelling

How do I best control swelling after a knee surgery?

Physical therapists often use the acronym RICE to educate patients in the principles of controlling the inflammatory response to injury or surgical trauma:

R: rest- Resting the leg after surgery allows the traumatized tissue structures to relax. Surgical procedures involving a bony repair require eight weeks of non-weight bearing status to allow the bone to heal. After a ligament repair, gentle weight-bearing exercises are allowed under the supervision of a physical therapist. Although an individualized home program is encouraged, excessive exercise is not advised.

I: ice- Cold modalities affect blood vessels through the process of vasoconstriction to decrease joint effusion. Choices include an ice pack, an ice water circulating cooler, or an ice cube massage. An ice bag works best over large, general areas and should be administered 15-20 minutes, 2-3x/day. Ice cooler units circulate cold water for a 15 minute treatment. An ice massage takes only 5-7 minutes and works best over bony prominences.

C: compression- Using an Ace bandage or a surgical sleeve to provide constant pressure around the knee joint prevents inflammatory by-products from collecting in the knee joint or draining into the lower leg during weight-bearing activities. The Ace wrap should be applied from top to bottom encompassing the entire knee joint.

E: elevation- Positioning several pillows under the heel prompts the inflammatory fluid to return to the bloodstream and flush back towards the heart to reenter the circulatory system. The key to elevation is to ensure the leg is above the level of the heart (lay flat on back with leg up). Combining the four RICE principles and resting the leg while compressing the joint with an ice bag in an elevated position for 20 minutes after exercise is the ideal situation to control swelling after a knee surgery.

-Rebecca L. Deal, MSPT

Next Page »